Agnes Varda Criticizes Lack of Recognition for Women Directors at European Film Awards

An article that briefly addressed Varda’s comments during last years european film award’s seems all too applicable again when thinking about the lack of diversity.
Agnes Varda
By Inkoo Kang | Women and HollywoodDecember 15, 2014 at 11:13AM
Ilmars Znotins/AFP/Getty ImagesAgnes Varda

One of the world’s most respected female directors has spoken out against the lack of recognition given to women in the film industry.

Upon receiving a lifetime-achievement honor from the European Film Awards, experimental documentarian Agnes Varda expressed gratitude for the distinction but also disappointment that so few other women received commendations at the ceremony.

“What I have noticed is that it is very sweet to receive this award but when I see the nominees here, I feel there are not enough women,” she said. “I think more women should be included. I know a lot of very good female directors and women editors, and I would like them be more represented and helped by the European film academy.”

The Polish film Ida took home the EFA’s top prize. Its producer, Ewa Puszczynska, echoed Varda’s criticisms.

“There are a lot of women directors not recognized yet who I believe are very talented. The same with cinematographers,” she noted. “There are various reasons why there are less women. We have families, we give birth to children, and that’s usually what keeps us back from being in the mainstream of our professions. In this industry it is still very difficult to leave to have a family and then come back. So very often it is a matter of sacrificing something, and that has led to there being less women in the film industry than there should be.”

[via The Guardian]

see one of many examples from the new york times

 January 15
It’s altogether fitting that a movie called “Whiplash” was the last one named Thursday when the nominations for best picture were announced by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.If the 87th Academy Awards lineup reflects anything, it’s an industry painfully — and occasionally exhilaratingly — torqued by social, technological and creative forces it can’t quite keep up with.As the lucky nominees were identified — first by the directors J.J. Abrams and Alfonso Cuarón, then by actor Chris Pine and Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs — an organization that has already been criticized for being old, white and male looked increasingly so. With such right-on exceptions as Sandra Adair in the editing category, precious few women were nominated for the top technical and creative awards. High-profile snubs included the author Gillian Flynn, who adapted her novel “Gone Girl” for the screen, and “Selma” director Ava DuVernay, who just a few weeks ago became the first African American woman ever nominated in that category at the Golden Globes. And David Oyelowo was overlooked for what most critics and viewers agree is an electrifying performance as the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in the film.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/2015-oscar-nominations-show-lack-of-diversity-in-a-year-when-films-didnt/2015/01/15/676f2cc2-9cc1-11e4-a7ee-526210d665b4_story.html

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